Storm threatens to ground Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade balloons

Storm threatens to ground Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade balloons

BIG BALLOONS: Models of a new balloons, Sponge Bob Square Pants, left, and Snoopy with Woodstock, the bird atop, are displayed during a preview of new Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade floats and balloons in Moonachie, N.J., Tuesday, Nov. 19. Those balloons, along with others, may not be able to fly in this year's parade due to high winds. Photo: Associated Press/Mel Evan

NEW YORK (AP) — The storm bearing down on the East Coast could scuttle a major Big Apple Thanksgiving tradition — the big balloons at the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Wind regulations say the balloons don’t fly if sustained winds exceed 23 mph and gusts exceed 34 mph.

PHOTOS: Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade preps 

Current forecasts call for sustained winds of 20 mph and gusts of 36 mph.

The parade is scheduled to step off in New York City at 9 a.m. eastern on Thanksgiving morning.

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